Access Control Lists (ACLs) for Cisco CCNA 200-125/100-105

Selecting specific traffic as it flows through a network is valuable to make networks function in a predictable way. This course, will walk you through the operation, implementation, and troubleshooting of standard and extended access control lists.
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
November 21, 2016
Duration
2h 37m
Table of contents
Description
Course info
Level
Intermediate
Updated
November 21, 2016
Duration
2h 37m
Description

Access Control Lists (ACLs) are an important and useful tool on a data network. ACLs allow an administrator to select traffic and filter traffic as it flows through a network. In this course, Access Control Lists (ACLs) for Cisco CCNA 200-125/100-105, you will first examine how standard and extended IPv4 access lists operate. Next, you'll learn how to implement each type of list on a router. Finally you'll explore common errors and how to troubleshoot ACLs using Wireshark. By the end of this course, you will be able to write your own access control lists to filter whatever traffic you want to either permit or deny on your networks.

About the author
About the author

For nearly 20 years, Ross has taught and managed data networks.

More from the author
Cisco CCNA: Network Control and Security
Intermediate
5h 37m
20 Jul 2017
More courses by Ross Bagurdes
Transcript
Transcript

Hi everyone, my name is Ross Bagurdes and welcome to my course Access Control Lists.

I am a network engineer with 20 years of experience in building and managing enterprise networks, and teaching people about them.

Access Control Lists are one of a network engineers greatest tools to manipulate traffic flow on a network. Understanding ACLs will allow you to manage a network, contain malicious traffic, and restrict access to devices and services.

In this course, we will learn about Standard and Extended Access Control Lists and how they can be applied to interfaces and other functions on a router.

By the end of this course you will be able to use wireshark to build and implement an Access Control list, as well as have a method to troubleshoot access control lists that are not functioning as desired.

Before beginning the course, you should be familiar with IP addressing, packet headers, TCP and UDP segments and headers, as well as how packets are routed through a network, which can be learned in the previous videos in the CCNA series.

(Optional) From here, you should feel comfortable diving into Network Address Translation course.

I hope you’ll join me on this journey to learn the Standard and extended Access Control lists with the Access Control List course, at Pluralsight.